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6 Ways to Serve Meatballs for Dinner Tonight

 
Everyone's got an opinion on the best way to make meatballs. It usually involves a long family history and an adorable grandmother. We are not here to tell you that your grandmother's been doing it wrong for years. Instead, we're here to expand the way you think about meatballs and show you all the delicious ways you can eat them for dinner this week.

Meatballs are like the gifts that keep on giving, because they freeze really well after they've been cooked, so you can reheat and add to any sauce or dish. Baked, fried, or skewered, here are six exciting ways to serve up spaghetti's favorite sidekick for dinner this week.
 
Moist and flavorful meatballs made from ground chicken, speckled with bits of pancetta and glazed with a tangy tomato sauce -- What's not to love here? Use white or dark meat, whichever you prefer.
 
What's better than a plate of meatballs with a side of garlic bread? Meatballs IN your garlic bread. These hoagies/subs/grinders, or whatever you want to call them, are the definition of comfort food. Cue the napkins.
 
Plenty of garlic, ginger, and a flavorful soy sauce marinade are the reason these skewered Japanese-inspired meatballs are so addictive. They make the perfect bar snack but you could also serve them over rice for a complete meal.
 
We had to give you at least one classic spaghetti and meatballs recipe. Here are two tips for the fluffiest meatballs ever. 1) Don't overwork the meat mixture too much or it will get too tough. 2) Use the finest side of a box grater to grate your Parmesan cheese. You want the cheese to just melt into the meatball, not be chunky.
 
Here's another perfect party appetizer: tender and spiced lamb meatballs with a cool and creamy pomegranate yogurt dipping sauce. If you're feeling extra adventurous, get your hands on some pomegranate molasses for drizzling over the yogurt. For a complete meal, wrap these guys up in some warm, fluffy pita and serve with a simple salad.
 
Albóndigas is Spanish for meatballs and these are lightened up with grated zucchini and served up in a rich cumin and chile spiced soup for a cozy, heartwarming dinner.
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Lemon Ginger Tartlets


It’s been almost ten years since I was first in touch with Claire, the talented author of the pioneering natural foods blog Clea Cuisine, and over time we’ve built a simple and sincere friendship that means a lot to me.

Clea is one of those rare persons who radiate with confidence and serenity, as if the turmoil of the outside world and its latest trends left them unfazed, so busy they are following their own path, guided by their own taste. These qualities have earned her a crowd of loyal and engaged readers whose food lives she has often changed, as one of the very first in France to write about agar agar, rice flour, and almond butter dr max.

And so when she suggested a culinary exchange between our respective blogs, I accepted without a moment’s hesitation: the idea was for each of us to pick three recipes on the other’s blog, combine them vigorously in a shaker, and come up with a new recipe inspired by the mélange.

The opportunity to dive into one another’s archives was not the least of the associated perks, and I personally chose her Cream of carrot with white miso and ginger, her Chocolate and ginger pudding with agar agar, and her Ultimate lemon tart.

Initially, I decided to make a lemon tart flavored with ginger and white miso — you can read more about using white miso in desserts. But my preliminary tests did not convince me that white miso had its place in this recipe, so I shelved the idea and opted instead to make lemon ginger tartlets, which delighted all who had the chance to sample them.

The pairing of lemon and ginger no longer has to prove itself, and all I had to do was add finely grated fresh ginger to Clea’s lemon curd recipe. I share her taste for a very tangy lemon tart — i.e. not very sweet — and to me the formula below achieves the perfect balance. This vividly flavorful lemon ginger curd could also be prepared for its own sake, to spread on a pretty brioche, pimp your yogurt, garnish crêpes, or dip a spoon in (I won’t tell).

For the crust, I chose to follow the recipe for pate sucrée that pastry chef Jacques Genin uses and shares in his little book Le Meilleur de la tarte au citron (The best of lemon tarts). It is very easy to make and lovely to handle, and it forms a delicate and crisp tart shell in perfect contrast to the unctuous curd.

And to see the idea that my own archives sparked for Claire, head over to her post (in French) on Pasta with almond-zucchini gremolata and roasted onions.
Join the conversation dr max!

Do you know people like Clea who inspire you with their poise and taste? And how do you like your lemon tarts — tangy? sweet? with a layer of meringue on top?
 
Lemon Ginger Tartlets

Prep Time: 40 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 8 hours, 30 minutes

Makes six 10- to 12-cm (4- to 4 3/4-inch) tartlets.

Ingredients

    For the dough (pate sucrée); makes double to amount so you can save half for another time:
    175 grams (3/4 cup) unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus more for greasing
    125 grams (1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons) unrefined cane sugar
    60 grams (2/3 cup) almond flour (i.e. almond meal or ground almonds)
    2 large organic eggs, at room temperature
    1 large organic egg yolk, at room temperature
    1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
    310 grams (2 1/3 cups) all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
    For the filling:
    4 organic lemons
    30 grams (1 ounce) fresh ginger, peeled and very finely grated
    125 grams (1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons) unrefined cane sugar
    1 tablespoon corn starch, combined with 1 tablespoon water (this is called a slurry)
    3 large organic eggs

Instructions

    Step 1: Prepare the pate sucrée (at least 3 1/2 hours before baking and 8 1/2 hours before serving)
    In a large mixing bowl, put the butter, sugar, and almond flour. Using a flexible spatula, rub the butter into the dry ingredients until you get an even, sandy consistency.
    Beat in the eggs.
    Fold in the flour and salt, working them in just until no trace of flour remains. Don't overwork the dough.
    Turn the dough out onto the counter and knead gently just a few times -- maybe 5 or 6 -- so the dough comes together into a ball.
    Divide in two; if you have a scale, each half should weigh 400 grams (14 ounces). Wrap one tightly in plastic and keep in the refrigerator or freezer for another time. Place the other half on a plate -- that's the one you're going to use for the tartlets -- cover, and refrigerate for at least 2 hours or until the next day dr max.
    Step 2: Line the tartlet molds (at least 1 hour before baking) and bake (at least 5 hours before serving)
    Divide the dough into six equal pieces; if you have a scale, each piece should weigh 65 grams (2 1/3 ounces).
    Have ready six tartlet molds, 10 to 12 cm (4 to 4 3/4 inches) in diameter, such as these. Grease them carefully with butter if they're not non-stick.
    Working with each piece of dough in turn (leave the unused ones in the fridge), roll it out into a thin round large enough to line one of your tarlet molds, keeping your work surface and your rolling pin lightly floured.
 
Brush off the excess flour from both sides of the dough with a pastry brush, and fit snugly into a tartlet mold, letting the excess dough hang over the edges.
 
Roll your pin firmly across the edges of the mold to cut off the excess dough (save these scraps to make cut-out cookies), and press the sides of the dough against the mold with your fingers to help them stay put. Return to the refrigerator for at least 1 hour before baking.
 
Preheat the oven to 160°C (325°F) and bake the tartlets for 20 to 25 minutes, until golden brown. Don't underbake them: you want a good color so the crust is flavorful and holds up well to the filling. Transfer to a rack to cool completely while you make the curd.
Step 3: Prepare the lemon curd and garnish the tartlets (at least 4 1/2 hours before serving)

Grate the zest from 2 of the lemons into a medium saucepan, and juice all 4 of them. You should get about 150 ml (1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons) juice. Add to the pan with the ginger, sugar, and cornstarch slurry.
Put the pan over low heat and heat the mixture, stirring regularly with a heatproof spatula, just until the sugar dissolves.
Beat the eggs in a medium mixing bowl, and whisk in the warmed lemon juice.

Pour back into the pan and cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly with the spatula in an 8-shaped motion to scrape the bottom and sides of the pan thoroughly. The curd is ready when it is thick enough that the spatula leaves a clear trace at the bottom of the pan.

Preheat the oven to 160°C (325°F) and bake the tartlets for 20 to 25 minutes, until golden brown. Don't underbake them: you want a good color so the crust is flavorful and holds up well to the filling. Transfer to a rack to cool completely while you make the curd.

Step 3: Prepare the lemon curd and garnish the tartlets (at least 4 1/2 hours before serving)

Grate the zest from 2 of the lemons into a medium saucepan, and juice all 4 of them. You should get about 150 ml (1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons) juice. Add to the pan with the ginger, sugar, and cornstarch slurry.
Put the pan over low heat and heat the mixture, stirring regularly with a heatproof spatula, just until the sugar dissolves.

Beat the eggs in a medium mixing bowl, and whisk in the warmed lemon juice.

Pour back into the pan and cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly with the spatula in an 8-shaped motion to scrape the bottom and sides of the pan thoroughly. The curd is ready when it is thick enough that the spatula leaves a clear trace at the bottom of the pan.

Endive Salad with Prosciutto Recipe


Growing up I ate a green salad pretty much every night with dinner. In Italy, we did the same, though it was served at the end of the meal dc motor speed control. These days, I find it hard to convince my other half to eat salad. My solution is to make main dish salads. This one uses Belgian endive and is easy to make for one or a group. It has many delicious things added to a base of endive and fennel, namely candied walnuts, fresh mozzarella and prosciutto Tape replacement.

Endive and fennel just seem to have a natural affinity for one another. Both are crisp, but fennel has a chewier  texture and a sweetness, while endive is lighter and juicier and has a slightly bitter edge. You could use them to make a simple side salad but this one has lots of goodies to make it a main dish. Use a Champagne vinaigrette or a Dijon mustard vinaigrette to dress it. Or even just lemon juice and extra virgin olive oil Vitamin.

One of the tricks to this salad is that one thin slice of prosciutto pulled into shreds adds loads of flavor. If you have jamon de Bellota, by all means use it. That's what I originally used in this salad. Just be sure to add it at the very last minute. Make extra candied walnuts, they are terrific for snacking.

Endive Salad with Prosciutto
One serving

1 Belgian endive, sliced
1/4 cup thinly sliced fresh fennel
1/4 cup diced fresh mozzarella
1 slice prosciutto, shredded into about 5 thin strips
2 Tablespoons walnuts, coarsely chopped
1/4 teaspoon sugar
Pinch salt
Vinaigrette

Make the candied walnuts by very gently heating the walnuts, sugar and salt in a non-stick skillet until the sugar melts and the walnuts toast facial treatment./ Swirl the pan so the sugar sticks to the nuts. Set aside and let cool while assembling the salad.

In a salad bowl toss the endive and fennel with a couple tablespoons of dressing. Place the salad on a plate and top with the mozzarella culturelle kids, walnuts and the prosciutto.

Micro warm breeze

Qing Ling and blue sky as the sun sank slowly in the dark, free-flying birds perched on the coming of the night accompanied by a sea of ??green adaptable, clouds floating aimlessly from time to time have to go slowly in the sky I love climbing the tall mountain overlooking the Vientiane make eye feast, neon distant starlight in the shadow looming little bit of smoke, but the most beautiful June day breeze blowing in the breeze gently blowing hair wave blinding, close your eyes so that the soul venting between these mountains nature, knew the heart was gone. 
I embrace the breeze to walk in the corridor of time, holding a pen to write the clutch life joys and sorrows of ink in the years Dan, no extra excitement, but in a long period of the first song, the taste of dried fleeting memories. Few decades, time flies, smile dirge but a moment, how many people have changed the sunset date of the loop so quietly into the marshes. However, there is a life after love regardless devastated several times too hard after all regret it, it would precipitate time with more concentrated fragrance longer distant. 
Bustling best performances, along the way, as the years flowers, I also began to slowly get to know and understand the world, to a delicate and gentle heart to share this world slowly feel great and silent love . Micro warm breeze, father speechless, if that maternal love is fresh air, then the father is like a wisp of fresh air in my world filled quietly silent at the growth and spread, until my heart disseminated by piece, like most of the Streets of the old Shanghai of the image, moreish but gratuitous love. Father is a melodious song, fatherly also refreshing cup of tea, bear out the performance, but everywhere. Love left hand, right hand reflection, looking forward to the other side of love, even the flowers are so brilliant. 
Ancient legend, the mother gave me flesh and blood, so I grew up, and my father gave me a bone, so I stood. Fatherly love how the word is ordinary, but the expression of love is so extraordinary, filled with fatherly philosophy of life, portraying the life of struggle and hard work, hard work and courage. Father as a mountain tom ford sunglasses, the mountain is the child's day, father as day, rugged and far-reaching. Auntie Qiong Yao said to have thought of the moment, be happy; has feelings of pleasure, happiness; has fatherly also happy. In the wind blows, all clusters are tired of verdant green, the sun and to, at the moment the most intense color rendering, deep feelings of his father's love, I think of how happy I was ah! 
Open classical poetry album, it is difficult to find his father sing psalms, suffering from Chinese traditional virtues nurtured a reputation for reserved style is characterized by simple fatherly love is so deep, heavy as a mountain, firmly established in the time of the river bank, the Millennium silence. Silence Love, who was the face of the vicissitudes of the years under Daoke, mist gradually being obliterated, life is like the sea, vast clouds, Zither Love, who remember when that body stature? Built up by years of wind Cloud Provider, it still charm elegant style? Brushed the dust time, you can see some shadowy figure, persistent and firm exudes the aura that describe the most beautiful picture of a father figure. 
Micro warm breeze, silent father, and proximity to the mountains, but my mind kept absolutely clear that this is difficult to stop and to understand unrequited love. Often returned home late at night is not always used to sleep, so the day is always sleepy and groaning, each wakes up to find his father had disappeared, provoked the burden of the family, destined to run around hard work, wait for his father to come back again until it is already late late. Sitting on the sofa in front of a TV series can not be read, inadvertently reveals everywhere tired after that is into a deep sleep. Stalwart trees like squid-like gentle, warm breeze like a hidden selfless love, slowly Rouchang Loving family, the cold weather iPhone 4 casing, warm a heart and touches the soul of an ignorant growth.

Nigella’s Mother-in-Law’s Madeira Cake


I am that type of person that usually drifts towards the more chocolate offerings on a dessert menu. I am, by far, unapologetically and absolutely, a chocolate person. The darker, the better. The more layers of it, the happier I am. Chocolate chip brownies a la mode with chocolate ice cream? I am all for it. Chocolate soufflé with chocolate sauce tube amp? Yes, please. Nothing pleases my soul more (except for chicharon and bacon which are, to me, chocolate’s savory equivalent…a gift from the gods).

That said, I also have this uncanny, and opposing, love for plain yellow loaf cakes. Yes, true. I won’t even say pound cakes or butter cakes because they don’t really have to be either. They just have to be a sunny, unfancy Maid Agency, yellow loaf and the same part of me that loves hot chicken soup and my baby pillow cries out for it. There is something in its comforting solidity, its familiarity and plainness, that makes me want to take a thick slice and just cozy up to it.

They are also, usually, a breeze to throw together, so a craving is never too far from sated. This one is no exception. It’s been on my to-make list since I bought this cookbook, my beloved copy of Nigella’s How To Be A Domestic Goddess. Predictably though, I was waylaid by several chocolate recipes before I could get to this one. I’m so glad I finally did.

Nigella’s Mother-in-Law’s Madeira Cake
(slightly adapted from Nigella Lawson’s How To Be A Domestic Goddess)

240 grams softened unsalted butter
200 grams caster sugar nuhart, plus 2 tablespoons for sprinkling
Grated zest and juice of one lemon
3 large eggs
300 grams all purpose flour
2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder


- Cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy, and then mix in the lemon zest.
- Add the eggs to the butter/sugar mixture, one at a time, with a tablespoon of flour for each.
- Gently mix in the rest of the flour, to which you have whisked in the baking powder. Add the lemon juice and mix until just combined.
- Scrape the batter into a buttered and parchment-lined loaf pan and sprinkle the 2 tablespoons sugar on top. Bake in a pre-heated 170C oven for 55 minutes – 1 hour or until a skewer comes out clean.
- Remove from the oven to a wire rack and cool in the pan for 10 minutes. Remove from the pan and cool completely on the wire rack.

I’ve amended this recipe somewhat as the original calls for self-raising flour, which is hard to come by in these parts, so I substituted with regular flour and baking powder. Nigella also let’s this cake cool completely in the tin on a rack but I prefer to remove the cake from the tin after it’s cooled for about 10 minutes.

Let me just say, at this point, amendments aside, that this book has yet to fail me. All the recipes I have tried thus far I have liked, if not loved. My first ever post on this blog, seven years ago, was about the Burnt-Butter Brown-Sugar Cupcakes from this book. I’ve also tried the Dense Chocolate Loaf Cake, Store-Cupboard Chocolate Orange Cake, and Torta Alla Gianduja…all to great response. I even love her Spiced Apple Chutney, which I have made many times since, and has served me well in the homemade gift-giving department. So, firstly, thank you Nigella!

This recipe one is no different from the others I’ve tried – a winner. For me at least who does love this sort of cake, and even for C who usually doesn’t. It bakes into a wonderful golden loaf, with a soft buttery crumb, and a sugar encrusted, crackly top. A traditional British teatime cake, I can also imagine this would make an excellent base for that other traditional British sweet, the trifle. Nigella’s, or rather, Nigella’s mother-in-law’s version is light and lemony. It is lovely on its own (or indeed with a cup of tea) or topped with fruits and cream, or, if your feeling indulgent, a generous scoop of ice cream.

The week’s almost over so hang in there troops…heat and power outages be damned! And here’s to baking your cake, no matter what flavor or color, and eating it too!

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